Bugle (Ajuga reptans)

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Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby oaxaca » Tue May 08, 2007 5:54 am

I was doing some plant ID'ing around my local woods, trying to find any plants of entheogenic interest when I came across these strange little beauties carpeting the floor near a reed bed. Anyway they turned out to be Ajuga reptans or commonly, Bugle.

After some net research it turns out these were popular in the past to speed the healing of open wounds and is apparantly very good at arresting blood flow (probably due to high conc. of tannin). It also contains digitalis-like substances. However the most interesting thing is that several reports say that it has narcotic & hallucinogenic properties!! It contains iridoid glycosides including harpagide- which is also in Devils Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens).

Long shot I guess, but has anyone (or there cats) tried this plant for themselves? Or perhaps heard mention of it or read about it?

:)
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby egor » Tue May 08, 2007 2:19 pm

http://www.floridata.com/ref/A/ajug_rep.cfm
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Ajuga+reptans

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...ubmed_docsu m
^^This one has the active constituents which are neo-clerodane diterpenes in adition to the ones you already mentioned.

Lots of botanical info, but very little on its use. I will try to find more when I have some time:\
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby Ferdinand » Tue May 08, 2007 7:36 pm

Digitalis can be quite harmful to the heart not sure of the concentrations of the analog though, or it's strength... scary stuff.

Interesting though that it arrests blood flow, as digitalis increases it.

Hmm.. haven't read anything on this plant before, doesn't mean it's active, but from the looks of things in its raw form is appears to be unsafe.

Interesting!, Jakeup
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby oaxaca » Wed May 09, 2007 6:04 am

Hey thanks for the replies! Yeah I cannot really find anymore info either as to any psychoactive properties. I guess the few anecdotes are all we have to go on.

Althogh i have found that Bugleweed (same family, different genus) as has some anecdotes stating it is a narcotic. However this particlular plant alters iodine metabolism, thus lowers thyroid function & thyroid stimulating hormone levels (useful in hyperthyroidism but not recommended for normal people) :p
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby teeko » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:27 pm

hxxp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TH7-43XFNC8-J&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view =c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_user id=10&md5=3197534f9715901d75928373550db934

"Four anthocyanins from Ajuga reptans flowers and its cell cultures were isolated, and a fifth was also characterized by HPLC-mass spectrometry. By means of chemical and spectroscopic analyses, their structures were identified as delphinidin 3-(p-coumaroyl-feruloyl)sophoroside-5-malonylglucoside, delphinidin 3-(diferuloyl)sophoroside-5-malonylglucoside, and cyanidin 3-(di-p-coumaroyl)sophoroside-5-glucoside, respectively. The other two were tentatively identified as delphinidin 3-(diferuloyl)sophoroside-5-glucoside and cyanidin 3-(feruloyl-p-coumaroyl)sophoroside-5-malonylglucoside. In neutral aqueous solution, the crude extract from A. reptans flower cell cultures and the major anthocyanin cyanidin 3-(di-p-coumaroyl)sophoroside-5-malonylglucoside were more stable than cyanidin 3-glucoside, and also prevented more efficiently peroxidation than did the latter. A. reptans flower cell culture anthocyanins may have a potential as natural colorants for food utilities or other purposes."

hxxp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10783005?dopt=Abstract

hxxp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TH7-3THJ28R-9&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view =c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_user id=10&md5=65a5b71cb4c1fd9ff409eef3df468ad8


"seen by some herbalists as possessing mildly narcotic and sedative effects and its use is believed to possibly have a lowering effect on the heart rate similar to the action of the digitalis plant"

"believed by some that it is somewhat narcotic and sedative, however it may cause cardiac arrest as foxglove can if it is used incorrectly"

I also noticed that Ajuga reptans is mentioned in "the new book of Salvias".

The Harpagophytum procumbens looks more of interest to me though:--->


"crude extracts of Harpagophytum procumbens allowed the rapid identification of novel, unstable chinane-type tricyclic diterpenes (1 and 2), along with numerous other constituents."

"H. procumbens root aqueous extract possesses analgesic, antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties" used to help with extremely painful conditions in South Africa

anyone have an account here --> hxxp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T9P-4GX1J27-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view =c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_user id=10&md5=6c92b34c4f929dfaca163df0e1f931da
Image

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All truths are circumstantial.
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby DayLight » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:57 pm

i have heard a diterpine found in this plant are the closest in structure to salvinorin A that has yet been found in nature.
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby entheodelic » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:33 pm

teeko wrote:[...]
I also noticed that Ajuga reptans is mentioned in "the new book of Salvias".
[...]

The New Book of Salvias says:

Under Salvia disjuncta Fernald:
[...] Ajuga reptans 'Jungle Beauty' makes an admirable dark green ground cover. Spikes of indigo-blue flowers 6-8 in (15-20 cm) tall appear in spring above handsome evergreen foliage. All plants require deep weekly watering during the active growth period.


Under Salvia splendens 'Van Houttei':
In an area protected by high shade, Salvia splendens 'Van Houttei' interplanted with the 4 ft (1.3 m) evergreen Viburnem utile provides the backbone of a restful and refreshing border. Ajuga reptans 'Jungle Beauty', the rather flat, dark green ground cover, completes the picture. [...]
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby teeko » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:37 pm

/\/\/\/\
Haha, well, i guess it looks really pretty next to some Salvia.

Ajuga reptans +1
Salvia FTW
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Re: Bugle (Ajuga reptans) -

Postby entheodelic » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:43 pm

Yes, you need to complete your borders, and flesh out your arrangements! Heh heh. ;)
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