A new take on amanita growth.

zubsza
Posts: 3232
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:48 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by zubsza » Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:00 pm

Is it common/possible for mushroom mycelium to produce spores without fruits?

It seems unlikely to me, but I really don't know that much about mycology. If the mycelium could produce spores without producing large fruits why would it bother expending the energy to produce the fruit? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems most forms of life have evolved in a way that allows them to only expend as much energy as is absolutely nessicary in performing normal functions (such as reproduction). It would seem to me that it would take far less energy to produce a small spore sac as opposed to a large mushroom fruit. Given that these assumptions are correct, why would the mycelium not take the route of most economical energy expenditure in all situations (ie nature vs culture)? It just doesn't seem to logicly add up.

Could one of the fine experts that frequent the forum here please address this question?

Edit: Maybe a symbiotic fungus that is present on A.M. Possibly depositing rogue spores on prints. A fugus that will grow in a culture where A.M. will not?????
Last edited by zubsza on Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

catfish
Posts: 3815
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2011 8:24 pm
Location: East of the Sun and West of the Moon
Contact:

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by catfish » Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:42 pm

Is it common/possible for mushroom mycelium to produce spores without fruits?
dunno
but Mr. Peele would prolly know
i am trying to get some materials together to perform this experiment
anyone know how to get the steps to do
since i am trying to reproduce a tek
would spores be ok to justr sprinke under the tree?
would spores be ok to just add to grape juice or grain?
where can i find microscopic ID of a fruit
to make sure it is indeed A. muscaria?
if spres and dried material are not avaiable
then i suppose an invitro sample would do
hell ill prolly just do em all!
;)
trade for what you want at the Botanical Swap Project: http://forums.botanicalswap.org/
and build your tradelist at our estore: http://shop.botanicalswap.org
specializing in high quality and low prices!

User avatar
RifeHeretic
Posts: 597
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 7:00 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by RifeHeretic » Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:24 pm

Did he ever send you a sample, Catfish?

catfish
Posts: 3815
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2011 8:24 pm
Location: East of the Sun and West of the Moon
Contact:

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by catfish » Fri Dec 08, 2006 4:20 pm

nope
but im patient
i will bide my time
i have 2 varieties of AM as reference samples
wish that more info was available
as to how to do this
im not buying the story
or the book
;)
trade for what you want at the Botanical Swap Project: http://forums.botanicalswap.org/
and build your tradelist at our estore: http://shop.botanicalswap.org
specializing in high quality and low prices!

User avatar
sunsnail
Posts: 1075
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 7:00 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by sunsnail » Fri Dec 08, 2006 7:22 pm

If what they are growing is some mold instead of AM, that would still be a very interesting discovery considering the mold has entheogenic properties.

zubsza
Posts: 3232
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:48 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by zubsza » Fri Dec 08, 2006 7:58 pm

If what they are growing is some mold instead of AM, that would still be a very interesting discovery considering the mold has entheogenic properties.
I agree. Either way this would be a very interesting study.

dial8
Posts: 45
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 7:00 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by dial8 » Mon Dec 11, 2006 5:24 pm

P. cystidiosus, an oyster species, can.
zubsza wrote:Is it common/possible for mushroom mycelium to produce spores without fruits?

zubsza
Posts: 3232
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:48 pm

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by zubsza » Mon Dec 11, 2006 5:50 pm

P. cystidiosus, an oyster species, can.
Thats very interesting. Do you know this from personal experience or from reading? If from books/internet could you post the source please? Do they produce the spores in the same way that is being decribed for the culture that is being grown in the grape juice (that is does it create spore sacs)? Does anyone know of any other species that does this?

User avatar
Crucial
Posts: 495
Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 7:00 pm
Location: near midnight

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by Crucial » Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:15 am

On the Yahoo Group; Amanita_muscaria · Amanita muscaria; Herb of Immortality

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amanit...a/message/1047

Hi Everyone
I just started a stem resurrection, we can use as a sample, and I have
a large amount of dried mycelium that was removed from a millet
culture. I am more than willing to provide samples. However, I think
that it means more if it's your own samples that you create. The hairy
mycelium that always appears following the book directions is very
distinctive and we have very good photos in this groups photo gallery
to compare your own results to. Everyone should visit this gallery and
check out the bread and wine culture photos.
The only times dried A muscaria mushrooms failed to resurrect for me,
was was when they were dried above 125 F. Also if they were properly
dried and then kept dried for more than 2years, they showed reduced
vigor. Other than that everyone that has the book should have an easy
time making their own samples or cultures, it's far easier than baking
bread.

Don
Last edited by Crucial on Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Crucial
Posts: 495
Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 7:00 pm
Location: near midnight

Re: An new take on amanita growth. -

Post by Crucial » Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:19 am

one more....
Hi everyone
Instead of trying to answer all your questions, perhaps I should ask
the questions and you answer.

1 Soma is an Immortal God, what does that mean?

2 The word Ambrose literally means not-mortal, why?

3 The word Nectar means corpse or death-over comer, again I ask you why?

4 In Wasson's book on Soma it is reported that early European
eyewitnesses saw Siberian tribes "ferment" Bilberry juice using dried
Amanita muscaria mushrooms. So what were these Siberians doing with
the Amanita Muscaria, please explain in detail how you "ferment" juice
with mushrooms and have no biological activity?

5 Dried Amanita Muscaria specimens from NY state, Taos NM, South
Africa, Latvia, Serbia, the SE United States and a Siberian strain
transplanted to the Olympic peninsula, have all been successfully
resurrected and the distinct fungus mycelium cultures produced were
identical in appearance, and this Fungus can only be produced in the
presence of the Amanita Muscaria. So please explain to me in detail
how this can be a Mucor?

6 Until 100 years ago all drug plants were tested for activity by what
is now called a bio-assay meaning someone consumed it to find out for
sure if it is active, our ancient ancestors and modern native tribes
have long used this method and with it, have discovered almost all the
valuable drug plants known to man. In comparison modern science with
all it's machines and tests, has over the last hundred years
discovered almost none, and those few drug plants it can try to claim
were actually already used by native people who discovered them by
bio-assay. So I ask you how many bio-assays of the mycelium produced
by Amanita Muscaria is enough, 1?, 10?, 100?, 1000? We have already
had over 100 different people try these cultures by bio-assay, is that
enough? Some of us have eaten pounds of the Living bread and have
drunk gallons of the Amanita wine, but we don't count, do we?

7 Since about 1965 it has been known that several basidiomycetes
(mushrooms etc.) have polymorphic mycelium that had been
microscopically and scientifically misidentified as a simpler fungus
complete with a species name. These polymorphic Basidiomycetes are
often found in archeological digs were mushrooms appeared to be used
as food or medicine by the ancient inhabitants. Mycology already has
such a bad record identifying polymorphic Basidiomycetes mycelium that
even if the mycelium produced by A muscaria was identified
microscopically as a simple fungus by the best lab in the world, it
still would prove nothing, since that named simple fungus could
actually be a misidentified polymorph of A muscaria. Would you spend
any money on microscopic tests of the A muscaria cultures, knowing the
background of misidentification already present in the science?

8 If you place a small amount of dried A muscaria cap in a small
volume of room temperature water, wait a few hours, and then place one
drop of this solution on a slide and observe through a microscope you
will see hundreds of A muscaria spores, which means that a few ounces
of this solution would contain millions to billions of spores. If you
continue to observe drops removed every few hours you can see the
spores rehydrate with the water and germinate a thread of mycelium, at
this point the solution quickly fills up with mycelium, and it becomes
impossible to follow the individual mycelium threads. Now would you
tell a wheat farmer that has just planted millions of viable wheat
seeds that there is no way he will grow wheat and that all he will get
is potatoes? How is that idiotic statement, any different from what
some of you are saying? Isn't the first law of Nature; plant a seed
and it will grow?

Think for yourself
Don Teeter
Last edited by Crucial on Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

Post Reply